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Showing 4 posts from September 2015.

RHCs and FQHCs – It’s time to take a second look at Alternate Payment Methodology

In July of 2014, Kentucky Medicaid established an Alternate Payment Methodology (“APM”) for all Federally-Qualified Health Centers (“FQHCs”) and Rural Health Clinics (“RHCs”) as an alternative to the all-inclusive encounter rate per patient under the standard prospective payment system (“PPS”) of 42 U.S.C. 1369a(aa). The APM allows for qualified centers to be reimbursed at a rate of 125% of the 2014 Medicare Upper Payment Limit for RHCs in place of the PPS system ($99.75 per covered visit). There are more advantages to APM than meet the eye, however, and qualified centers currently using PPS method should at the very least reevaluate APM, as proposed changes will make APM even more attractive and potentially risk-free. More >

A Shot in the Arm of Preventive Health Services

The ripple effects of recent changes to the health care industry are still being measured, but Kentucky is already touting what it views as a positive impact of the Commonwealth’s decision to accept the Medicaid expansion under the law. More >

FCC Guidance on Cellphones Puts the Squeeze on Medical Debt Collectors

In July, the FCC released an order it touted as strengthening “consumer protections against unwanted calls and texts.” It was a series of rulings based on the Telephone Consumer Protection Act meant to clarify the use of autodialers, procedures for wrong numbers and consent to call, mainly concerning cellphones. Under these new regulations, healthcare providers must get express written consent to be able to contact patients on their mobile phones about medical debt and billing. More >

NIST standards provides an oasis of mobile device security in the EHR desert

The healthcare industry has long awaited some certainty in the arena of mobile devices in light of the continued push for electronic health records (“EHR”) and coordinated care. The prevalence, convenience, and speed of such devices is beyond discussion. According to the 2015 HIMSS Mobile Technology Survey, found that 90% of healthcare providers use them in their organizations. Mobile devices provide clinicians with quick access to information at the point of care. However, the use of mobile devices brings a mountain of security risks for covered entities, including the loss or theft of the mobile device and unsecure exchange of health information. When every individual entering a facility has a mobile device, the large number of mobile devices using a facility’s network can overload the system. More >

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