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Showing 6 posts in Advanced Practice Registered Nurses.

Three Factors Affecting the Mid-Level Practitioner Workforce, Part Two

Posted In Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, APRNs, HPSA, HRSA, Limited Services Clinics, Mid-Level Practitioners

In the last post, the subjects of collaborative agreements and autonomy were discussed in relation to how they affect mid-level practitioners. Today’s post now turns to how HRSA designation and limited services clinics will ultimately influence that workforce as well. More >

Three Factors Affecting the Mid-Level Practitioner Workforce, Part One

Posted In Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, Affordable Care Act, APRNs, Mid-Level Practitioners

As more Kentuckians gain access to health care as a result of the Affordable Care Act, healthcare workforce shortages for primary care providers becomes problematic particularly in rural Kentucky. Never before have mid-level practitioners been more important. The Health Resource and Services Administration (“HRSA”) estimates that there will be a shortage of 20,400 primary care ­physicians by 2020, but this number could be drastically reduced – as low as 6,400 – with an abundant increase in the autonomous practice of mid-level providers[1]. The same HRSA study concluded that a fully-utilized workforce of mid-level practitioners could account for 28% of all primary care by 2020. Three factors make mid-level practice more attractive than ever in Kentucky. More >

FTC: Don’t Limit APRNs Crucial Role in Health Care

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) recently released a policy paper suggesting that state legislators should be cautious when evaluating legislative proposals to limit the scope of practice of Advance Practice Registered Nurses (“APRNs”). The FTC is concerned that by imposing more stringent physician supervision requirements, APRNS are effectively being restricted by another type of health care professional (the physician) thereby denying consumers the benefits of greater competition. This is especially troubling in light of the significant shortage of primary care practitioners in the U.S. By allowing APRNs to practice without heavier regulatory burdens, access to health care can be increased and possibly lead to “lower costs, better care, and more innovation,” according to the FTC. More >

Categorizing Nurses under the Fair Labor Standards Act

There has been a surge of nursing lawsuits in recent years, with nurses arguing they have been denied overtime pay, meal breaks, and fair wages as guaranteed to them by the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). The FLSA makes a distinction between exempt and non-exempt employees, with the latter receiving overtime and wage protection. More >

The Doctor Is Out, But The PA Will See You Now

Posted In Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, Health Care Law, House Bill 104, Physician Assistants

On March 25, 2013, Governor Steve Beshear signed House Bill 104, a bill that will change how Physician Assistants (“PAs”) practice in the Commonwealth. Under former law, a PA had to be directly supervised in by a doctor in the first eighteen months of their medical practice. Kentucky had the longest supervision requirement of any state in the U.S. More >

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