Lobbying Affiliate: MML&K Government Solutions
{ Banner Image }

Real Estate Law Blog

Make sure you're on solid ground before you break it.

Contact Us

* Indicates a required field.

Categories

McBrayer Blogs

Showing 4 posts from May 2014.

Why Use an Exclusive Use Clause?

If you are a business owner and in the process of negotiating the terms of your commercial lease, you will want to be sure to include an exclusive use clause to the document and negotiate the terms with the landlord. Exclusive use clauses are intended to protect a tenant’s business by ensuring that the named tenant is the only tenant in a particular shopping center that can sell or offer to sell specific products or services. In some cases (generally, where a tenant has more bargaining power), an exclusive use clause may extend to any other properties owned by the landlord or an affiliate of the landlord within a certain radius. More >

When Disaster Strikes

In Kentucky, the arrival of spring is unfortunately accompanied by wild weather. Tornadoes and flash flooding can happen without a moment’s notice. You cannot stop severe weather but, you can prepare for it. When disaster strikes, property and casualty insurers must spring into action with disaster response plans. How quickly an insurer can help return someone’s life back to normal is largely dependent on how well you, the insured, are equipped to weather the storm. Here are some tips to help you plan for the unexpected: More >

Lenders Take Note: CFPB Issues Guide to Forms

Big changes are in store for real estate closings in 2015 (we first wrote about it here). Now, lenders have some guidance from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) as to how complete forms that will become mandatory in August 2015. More >

Considerations before Co-Signing

When I was looking for my first apartment, I was a student, had little money and was far from an ideal tenant. Luckily, my parents co-signed on the lease and I was handed the keys to my new place. At the time, I had no idea what risks my parents were taking by putting their signature next to mine on that lease agreement. Now, as a real estate attorney, I often see people co-signing on mortgages – generally a much bigger financial obligation than an apartment – and I wonder if they have considered the hazards associated with signing their name on the dotted line. Not every co-signing situation ends badly, and some work out with no problems at all, but there are times when a co-signor bites off more than they can chew and, as a result, are left with a very bad taste in their mouth from the whole closing process. If you are thinking about serving as a co-signor, I urge you to consider the following: More >

Ashland, KYLexington, KYLouisville, KYFrankfort, KY: MML&KFrankfort, KY LawGreenup, KYWashington, D.C.