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Photo of Real Estate Law Blog Brendan R. Yates
Associate
byates@mmlk.com
859-231-8780, ext. 208
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The value I bring to the client and the McBrayer firm is that I am willing to work hard to obtain the goals/objectives that the client wants to achieve with his or her particular case …

Showing 11 posts by Brendan R. Yates.

Suing Your Tenant for Damages – Can You Recover Attorney’s Fees?

Posted In Breach, Landlord, Lease

It’s one of the larger mines in the minefield of renting out property as a landlord – what happens when the tenant breaches the lease? What happens when the tenant doesn’t pay? In and among the questions presented by such a scenario is whether a suit against the tenant would be cost-effective. The landlord’s decision may, in large part, depend on whether the landlord is entitled to recover its costs and attorney fees associated with prosecuting its claim against the tenant. And, in Kentucky, the landlord’s right to recover costs and attorney fees depends on the circumstances surrounding the tenant’s breach of the lease. More >

Public Improvement Liens on Government-Owned Projects

While prior blog posts have discussed the basics of mechanics liens as they relate to private construction projects, this post addresses public improvement liens on property owned by the state, a subdivision or agency thereof, or by any city, county, urban-county, or charter county government (hereafter collectively “Government Entity”).[1] As one may imagine, while the principle purpose behind the filing of public improvement liens and private mechanics liens is the same (i.e. to ensure payment for labor, materials and/or supplies furnished on the project), perfection and enforcement of public improvement liens on property owned by a Government Entity differs significantly from the perfection and enforcement of mechanic’s liens against privately owned property. More >

Bonding off a Private Mechanic’s Lien In Kentucky

In my previous post, I discussed the basics of filing a private mechanic’s lien in Kentucky. Today, the subject will turn to the release of a private mechanic’s lien by execution of a bond. Execution of a bond for release of lien (the “Bond”) provides the owner of property against which a mechanic’s lien has been asserted, or the contractor who contracted with the owner for the provision of labor and/or materials for improvement of the property, an avenue of relief whereby the owner or contractor can have a mechanic’s lien filed against the property released. Utilization of a Bond is particularly helpful when a dispute arises regarding the validity of an asserted mechanic’s lien. More >

The Basics of Filing a Private Mechanic’s Lien in Kentucky

A mechanic’s lien is an invaluable tool for contractors and others who supply labor or materials for improvements to real property. In its most basic sense, a mechanic’s lien provides security for these groups so that they are not left at the mercy of a defaulting contractor or property owner. The discussion set forth herein only addresses the requirements for filing and perfecting a mechanic’s lien against a privately owned parcel of real property. The requirements for filing and perfecting a public improvement lien differ from those discussed below. More >

Disclosures Landlords Must Make in Kentucky

Posted In Landlord, Lease, Tenant, URLTA

There are certain required disclosures that a landlord must make when renting property located within a jurisdiction that has adopted Kentucky’s Uniform Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (“URLTA”). While these disclosure requirements are straightforward, a landlord’s failure to comply can have serious consequences for both the landlord and the tenant. More >

Tenant Absence During the Lease Term: Protecting Your Property

Every landlord’s goal is to have his/her rental property under lease and occupied by tenants who will not only pay their rent on time, but who will properly use and maintain the property. After all, the property is an investment by the landlord of both time and money. While landlords typically relate property damage to tenants’ use of the property (i.e. throwing wild parties or vandalism), nonuse can also result in significant damage to the property, not only causing damage to the structure itself, but a diminution in value of the property overall. This is especially true during the winter months. For example, a tenant may take an extended vacation for the holidays or even abandon the property altogether. Any time a property is unoccupied for an extended period of time, maintenance issues may go undetected and/or other problems may arise unbeknownst to the tenant(s) or the landlord. These issues/problems may include the heat being turned off by the tenant, running water left on, a leaky faucet, a stove being left on, an electrical issue, or the shut off of one or more utilities by the respective utility company for nonpayment. Such issues can result in damage to the property, including, but not limited to, frozen/burst pipes, flooding, or fire. Moreover, the damage can extend to other units and/or affect the safety of neighboring tenants. Thus, it is important for a landlord to know when a tenant is going to be gone for an extended period of time. More >

Finding the Perfect Fit the Right Way

Many of the issues that landlords encounter with problem tenants can be avoided or, at least minimized, by using a comprehensive screening process. This is sometimes easier said than done. Screening applicants in order to find the right fit is legal. However, landlords must be mindful that, under the Fair Housing Act and other applicable state and federal laws, a landlord cannot refuse to rent or lease to a person or otherwise discriminate against a person based on race, color, religion, sex, familial status, disability or national origin. Furthermore, while background searches and/or credit checks can be an effective screening method, a landlord must adhere to certain procedures during the application process. It is important to have the process outlined beforehand and carefully follow it with each prospective tenant to ensure fairness and consistency. The following are some helpful guidelines to keep in mind in the screening process: More >

“Mi Casa Es Su Casa”… Not So Fast, Landlords

Posted In Uncategorized

Mi Casa Es Su Case translates to “My House Is Your House.” That sounds nice, and while technically true, tenants are not always so welcoming to their landlord. In fact, sometimes they may downright refuse to let their landlord enter their unit. There are several reasons that access by the landlord to an occupied unit may be necessary: to address a disturbance, to respond to an emergency, to make repairs, etc. However, a landlord must be mindful of the parties’ respective rights under the Uniform Residential Landlord Tenant Act.[1]While tenants generally have a right to quiet and exclusive possession of the property during the lease term, the tenants may not unreasonably withhold consent or deny access to the landlord.[2] Pursuant to Kentucky Revised Statute (KRS) 383.615, the landlord is entitled “to enter the dwelling unit in order to inspect the premises, make necessary or agreed repairs, decorations, alterations, or improvements, supply the necessary or agreed services, or exhibit the dwelling unit to prospective or actual purchasers, mortgagees, tenants, workmen, or contractors.”[3] More >

Landlords, Make Sure Your Eviction is URLTA-Compliant

As tempting as it may be to immediately attempt to throw an unruly and non-abiding tenant out of the house or apartment, doing so can have serious legal consequences. Kentucky has codified the Uniform Residential Landlord Tenant Act in KRS 383.500 – 383.715 (“URLTA”). Pursuant to KRS 383.500, in order for the URLTA to be applicable in a given locale, that particular city, county, or urban county government must adopt the URLTA in its entirety. In areas where the URLTA has been adopted, tenants are often afforded greater protection at the landlord’s expense. More >

Not So Fast On Your “No Pets” Policy

Many landlords enforce a “no pets” policy in their rental units – and for good reason. Pets can be destructive, frighten other tenants, and increase landlords’ liability exposure. Such a policy, however, can be discriminatory to those with disabilities. While most landlords understand their obligation to make an exception for service animals, not all know what to do when a tenant requests to keep an emotional support animal (“ESA”) in their unit.

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