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Photo of Real Estate Law Blog Christopher A. Richardson
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crichardson@mmlk.com
502-327-5400, ext. 304
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The real estate attorneys at McBrayer have a reputation for understanding the developmental needs of our clients and not only what it is that they need now, but what they will need in the …

Showing 12 posts by Christopher A. Richardson.

AAA Revises Construction Arbitration Rules

Posted In Arbitration

New home constructionThe American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) revised its Construction Industry Arbitration Rules and Mediation Procedures (“Rules”) as of July 1, 2015. Many of the changes are designed to streamline the arbitration process, making it more efficient and cost-effective. While there were many noteworthy changes in the rules, we summarize the most significant and far-reaching revised and new rules below. It is important to note that not all the revised or new rules will apply to contracts in effect before the rules took effect, so the following provisions may or may not apply to existing claims. More >

The Obergefell Decision and Property Considerations for Married Same-Sex Couples

In Obergefell v. Hodges, the United States Supreme Court, in a 5-4 opinion, determined that prohibitions on same-sex marriage are an unconstitutional infringement of Fourteenth Amendment rights. This decision throws the doors open for same-sex marriages, affording same-sex married couples the same rights and privileges only enjoyed by opposite-sex couples until recently. This expansion of marriage allows same-sex couples to take advantage of certain legal benefits, and property law is no exception. Same-sex married couples may now hold property in a tenancy by the entirety, a form of title available exclusively to married couples owning together. More >

Seller Financing After Dodd-Frank

The provisions of Dodd-Frank have been in place just under a year and a half, having come into effect on January 10, 2014, and the provisions of the law that concern seller financing of real estate made significant changes as to how investors use seller financing in these transactions. Now that the rules have been in place for a while and the dust has settled, basic rules concerning private loans from sellers warrant a brief review. At the outset, it is worth noting that these regulations apply to sales only to owner occupants, not sales of commercial or investment properties. The new regulations treat anyone who performs the activities related to the origination of a residential mortgage loan as a “mortgage originator” by default. What this means is that sellers who finance their real estate transactions must be a licensed mortgage originator or include a licensed mortgage originator in the transaction. Financing sellers can be exempt from these rules, however, if certain criteria are met. First, the seller must provide financing for the sale of three or fewer properties in a 12-month period, and the property must have been owned by the seller and used as security for the loan. Second, the seller must not have constructed the residence or acted as a contractor in the construction as part of the ordinary course of their business. Finally, the loan must be fully paid off after a set duration (no balloon payments) and have a fixed interest rate or an adjustable rate that remains fixed for at least five years, and the seller must determine in good faith that the borrower will be able to pay the loan. If the rate does adjust, it must be tied to a widely-available index such as LIBOR or U.S. Treasury securities. Under these rules, a person, trust or business entity can act as a financing seller. Homeownership 2If the seller only finances one property in a year and is a natural person, an estate or a trust, the seller does not have to determine and document the borrower’s ability to pay, although the loan requirements remain the same. If the seller finances more than three properties, the mortgage originator provisions apply, as well as the specific limitations on the loan. Another important distinction to note is that, while the ability-to-pay provisions of Regulation Z[1] apply only to “creditors” as defined by that regulation – those who finance more than five “transactions secured by a dwelling”[2] in a year, Dodd-Frank applies the same provisions to those who finance three or more transactions to owner-occupants in a year. In other words, financing sellers who conduct only four transactions a year are exempt from the ability-to-pay portions of Regulation Z, but not from Dodd-Frank. Negotiating any seller-financing deal is tricky, but the provisions of Dodd-Frank add a new layer of complexity to the process. Let the attorneys of McBrayer, McGinnis, Leslie & Kirkland, PLLC make the process less difficult by providing guidance and assistance in the transaction. CRichardsonChristopher A. Richardson is an associate at McBrayer, McGinnis, Leslie & Kirkland, PLLC in the Louisville, KY office. Mr. Richardson concentrates primarily in real estate, where he is experienced in residential and commercial closing transactions, landlord/tenant relations, and mortgage lien enforcement/foreclosure. Mr. Richardson has closed innumerable secondary market and portfolio residential real estate transactions and his commercial practice ranges from short-term collateralized financing and construction lending to development revolving lines of credit. He can be reached at 502-327-5400 or crichardson@mmlk.com. This article is intended as a summary of  federal and state law and does not constitute legal advice. [1] 12 C.F.R. § 1026.43 [2] 12 C.F.R. § 1026.2 (a)(17)(v) More >

Tenants are Left in the Cold after the Sunset of the Protecting Tenants in Foreclosure Act

Posted In Landlord, Tenant

For a time, the Protecting Tenants in Foreclosure Act of 2009 (“the Act”) provided some protection for tenants against foreclosures on a landlord’s property. The law gave tenants in foreclosed properties protections against successors in interest of the property. The law was set to expire in 2012, but Congress extended the provisions to December 31, 2014. Efforts to re-extend the law failed, and it is now expired. This is bad news for tenants of residential real estate whose landlords face foreclosure, as now state law applies in absence of federal protectionHispanic couple outside home for rents. More >

The Truth in Lending Act and Rescission: Lessons Learned by Lenders from Jesinoski v. Countrywide

The Supreme Court just made mortgage rescission a little bit easier for borrowers and scarier for lenders in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans. Under the Truth in Lending Act, 15 U.S.C. §1601-1677 (“TILA”), mortgage lenders are required to disclose the rights of obligors and other material disclosures to borrowers. Borrowers have a right of rescission for three days from the transaction or until the disclosures are made, up to three years after the transaction. The borrower must give notice to the lender of his or her exercise of the right to rescind within those time periods. More >

“Is this the airport, Clark?” – Aunt Bethany

Your guests have arrived and you’ve just spent that last ten hours Griswolding your home and now you and your company are standing in the front yard ready to bask in the warm glow of a million tiny lights, when your neighbor strolls over and says, “I wouldn’t do that. The homeowner’s association won’t allow it. Oh, and you can’t park there.” What? But you nearly died placing those reindeer on the roof! And where are all these people supposed to park?? More >

‘Tis The Season To Think About Your Retail Lease

With November nearly upon us, the holiday shopping season is right around the corner. For retailers, the peak season can bring a whole host of issues to be considered in connection with a commercial lease. The best time to think about these issues is now – before the droves of eager customers start lining up at the doors. So, if you are a retailer and lease a space for your business, take a few minutes and consider the following: More >

Is An Interest-Only Mortgage Right For You?

There are a number of financing options to consider when purchasing a home, one of which is the interest-only mortgage. This type of mortgage requires a homeowner to pay only the interest that accrues on the loan each month. None of the principal is paid off until the interest-only period expires. The length of the interest-only periods can vary, but payments are relatively low during this time. After expiration of the interest-only term, the buyer is then required to make monthly payments for the principal. More >

A Slippery Slope for Boat Slips

What happens when an existing condominium property regime is found to be invalid? Well, the Louisville Yacht Club recently encountered that exact problem. The case, Steenrod v. Louisville Yacht Club Ass’n, Inc.,[1] is one which Kentucky boat owners and condominium association members should be familiar so as to avoid similar problems.

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Why Use an Exclusive Use Clause?

If you are a business owner and in the process of negotiating the terms of your commercial lease, you will want to be sure to include an exclusive use clause to the document and negotiate the terms with the landlord. Exclusive use clauses are intended to protect a tenant’s business by ensuring that the named tenant is the only tenant in a particular shopping center that can sell or offer to sell specific products or services. In some cases (generally, where a tenant has more bargaining power), an exclusive use clause may extend to any other properties owned by the landlord or an affiliate of the landlord within a certain radius. More >

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