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Showing 7 posts in Closing.

Bankers, Real Estate Loans, and the Unauthorized Practice of Law: A Refresher

Posted In Closing, Lenders

Back in 1968, the Kentucky Bar Association (“KBA”) released Unauthorized Practice of Law Opinion KBA U-6 (“U-6”), opining that bank officers and lending institutions could not draft loan documents such as mortgages, security agreements or financing statements without violating the provisions of Kentucky law that prohibit the unauthorized practice of law. It is entirely within the province of attorneys in the Commonwealth of Kentucky to draft legal documents, and this KBA opinion merely reinforced that idea. So far, so good, right? Opinion U-6 was not the last word on where the role of the lender can dovetail with the practice of law, however, and all lenders should take heed of where potential landmines of the unauthorized practice of law in violation of KRS §524.130 still exist. More >

The New TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Requirements

Farewell, HUD-1, we hardly knew ye. As of October 3rd, 2015, lenders will provide two integrated forms at specified intervals surrounding the closing date to comply with the provisions of both the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”) and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974 (“RESPA”). The new forms are the result of provisions from Sections 1098 and 1100A of the Dodd-Frank Act meant to combine and simplify existing documents to make them easier for mortgagors to understand. More >

Mortgage Prequalification versus Preapproval

First time home-buyers are often under the impression that mortgage prequalification and preapproval are interchangeable terms, but they are actually two separate steps in the financial process and it is important to understand the difference between them. More >

Lenders Take Note: CFPB Issues Guide to Forms

Big changes are in store for real estate closings in 2015 (we first wrote about it here). Now, lenders have some guidance from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) as to how complete forms that will become mandatory in August 2015. More >

Lenders: Are You Using Electronic Signatures?

Earlier this year, the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) announced that they would begin accepting electronic signatures on documents associated with mortgage loans. FHA already allows e-signatures on some third party documents, outside of the lender’s control. The announcement, which became effective immediately, expanded the documents for which e-signatures are acceptable and now includes: More >

Fraud Risks High for Multi-Unit Property Mortgages

A recent report, published by Interthinx, an anti-fraud vendor for the financial services industry, revealed that loans associated with multi-unit properties have a much higher fraud risk than loans associated with other property types. Mortgage fraud occurs when an individual makes a material misstatement, misrepresentation, or omission which is relied upon by an underwriter or lender to fund, purchase, or insure a loan. More >

A New Beginning for Closings

Currently, under federal law, within three business days after receiving an application, mortgage lenders must deliver two different disclosures to the applicants: an early Truth in Lending Statement and a Good Faith Estimate. At closing, two more disclosures are required: a final Truth in Lending Statement and a HUD-1 settlement statement. Starting Aug. 1, 2015, that long-established process will change. The forms will be reduced to two and simplified so that consumers will be able to mortgage shop more easily and understand their mortgage terms and costs more thoroughly. More >

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