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Showing 7 posts in Lease.

New Accounting Standards from FASB Create Big Changes for Leases

Posted In Commercial Lease, Lease

In February, The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) addressing financial reporting about transactions involving leases. These new accounting standards have been in gestation for many years, and any company that leases any property, from equipment to real estate, will be affected by them. More >

Suing Your Tenant for Damages – Can You Recover Attorney’s Fees?

Posted In Breach, Landlord, Lease

It’s one of the larger mines in the minefield of renting out property as a landlord – what happens when the tenant breaches the lease? What happens when the tenant doesn’t pay? In and among the questions presented by such a scenario is whether a suit against the tenant would be cost-effective. The landlord’s decision may, in large part, depend on whether the landlord is entitled to recover its costs and attorney fees associated with prosecuting its claim against the tenant. And, in Kentucky, the landlord’s right to recover costs and attorney fees depends on the circumstances surrounding the tenant’s breach of the lease. More >

Disclosures Landlords Must Make in Kentucky

Posted In Landlord, Lease, Tenant, URLTA

There are certain required disclosures that a landlord must make when renting property located within a jurisdiction that has adopted Kentucky’s Uniform Residential Landlord and Tenant Act (“URLTA”). While these disclosure requirements are straightforward, a landlord’s failure to comply can have serious consequences for both the landlord and the tenant. More >

Tenant Absence During the Lease Term: Protecting Your Property

Every landlord’s goal is to have his/her rental property under lease and occupied by tenants who will not only pay their rent on time, but who will properly use and maintain the property. After all, the property is an investment by the landlord of both time and money. While landlords typically relate property damage to tenants’ use of the property (i.e. throwing wild parties or vandalism), nonuse can also result in significant damage to the property, not only causing damage to the structure itself, but a diminution in value of the property overall. This is especially true during the winter months. For example, a tenant may take an extended vacation for the holidays or even abandon the property altogether. Any time a property is unoccupied for an extended period of time, maintenance issues may go undetected and/or other problems may arise unbeknownst to the tenant(s) or the landlord. These issues/problems may include the heat being turned off by the tenant, running water left on, a leaky faucet, a stove being left on, an electrical issue, or the shut off of one or more utilities by the respective utility company for nonpayment. Such issues can result in damage to the property, including, but not limited to, frozen/burst pipes, flooding, or fire. Moreover, the damage can extend to other units and/or affect the safety of neighboring tenants. Thus, it is important for a landlord to know when a tenant is going to be gone for an extended period of time. More >

‘Tis The Season To Think About Your Retail Lease

With November nearly upon us, the holiday shopping season is right around the corner. For retailers, the peak season can bring a whole host of issues to be considered in connection with a commercial lease. The best time to think about these issues is now – before the droves of eager customers start lining up at the doors. So, if you are a retailer and lease a space for your business, take a few minutes and consider the following: More >

Why Use an Exclusive Use Clause?

If you are a business owner and in the process of negotiating the terms of your commercial lease, you will want to be sure to include an exclusive use clause to the document and negotiate the terms with the landlord. Exclusive use clauses are intended to protect a tenant’s business by ensuring that the named tenant is the only tenant in a particular shopping center that can sell or offer to sell specific products or services. In some cases (generally, where a tenant has more bargaining power), an exclusive use clause may extend to any other properties owned by the landlord or an affiliate of the landlord within a certain radius. More >

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