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Showing 2 posts from March 2016.

Contract Brewing in a Nutshell

The brewing world has come a long way over the past ten years.  Local breweries are an everyday part of our lives providing a wide variety of product on a local, regional and national level to even the most novice of beer drinkers.  As a result of this boon, there are endless opportunities to become a part of the craft beer movement.  One of these opportunities is afforded through the concept of contract brewing. Contract brewing is a burgeoning trend whereby an aspiring, or existing, brewer contracts with another brewery to brew and package beer on their behalf. This may be done for several reasons, such as the desire for a small business to get its foot into the brewing door, the expanded capacity or bottling ability of the contract brewer.  The Department of the Treasury Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (“TTB”), which oversees many federal alcohol regulations, considers contract brewing arrangements to be “ordinary commercial agreements.” As alcohol production is a highly-regulated industry, there are still, of course, several regulations and considerations in place with respect to brewing beer on a contract basis, so what follows is a brief overview of the various federal law issues at play. More >

Fudging a Five-Star Rating – Can It Hurt?

An online reputation can make or break a business. Though word-of-mouth is still important, most consumers today take to the Internet when looking for a place to shop, eat, vacation, or play. It is no surprise, then, that businesses want to boost their online ratings and garner gleaming reviews on sites such as Yelp, Angie’s List, TripAdvisor, Urbanspoon, and the like. Is there really any harm in requiring an employee to post a positive review under a fake name? How about paying a stranger to sing your business’s praises, even if he or she has never used its services? It may seem like a harmless form of self-promotion, but engaging in this practice can be illegal and very expensive. More >

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