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McBrayer Blogs

Breaking Down the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

The federal Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is the law that keeps manufacturers up at night, and rightfully so. The law is designed to provide a remedy to consumers for failure of manufacturers to abide by their warranties, but it provides an even heavier cudgel for attacking manufacturers than Congress may have intended.  Regardless of its flaws, it pays to understand the outline of the law as it applies to manufacturers. More >

Legislature Takes the Bite Out of Landlord Liability for Dogs

In news that should have tails wagging for landlords and insurance providers throughout the Commonwealth, the statehouse passed a revision to the law that confers liability on dog owners by largely exempting landlords from liability.  This modification is a response to a 2012 Kentucky Supreme Court case that conferred potential strict liability on landlords for dog bites. Since that decision five years ago, landlord groups, insurance companies, and chambers of commerce have been working to pass a law to clarify that liability is the responsibility of the dog owner. Earlier this year, Rep. Stan Lee of Lexington led the charge  to make the change in law, which is expected to result in lower insurance premiums and less court appearances for landlords across the state. More >

No Malice Aforethought: The Current State of "Malicious Prosecution"

To effectively limit and guide human behavior, the law needs (at least) discoverability, predictability and, above all, consistency. To be just, a cause of action and its elements should be defined and applied in the same way for similarly-situated individuals. That makes it especially problematic that there are so many conflicting rules and interpretations for “malicious prosecution” at both the state and federal levels. More >

The Case for Diversity in a Law Firm Setting

Posted In Corporate, Diversity

As lawyers and legal professionals, we work in one of the least diverse professions in the country. At McBrayer, we are committed to doing our part to help improve diversity and inclusion in the profession. Lawyers can be slow to change, much like the law itself, but several recent initiatives give us hope.  More >

Rule 30(b)(6) in Depositions and at Trial

Posted In Litigation

One of the big “if only” moments in corporate litigation concerns testimony: if only a corporation as a corporation could face deposition. Despite the legal fiction that corporations have an identity, it remains impossible, absent some serious and frightening advances in future technology, for a corporation to testify on its own behalf. To get around this dilemma, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure include Rule 30(b)(6) (“30(b)(6)”). This rule allows a party to name an entity such as a corporation, an association or a governmental agency as a deponent, and that entity will then designate a representative to be deposed on behalf of the company. (Kentucky’s Civil Rule of Procedure 30.02(6) substantially tracks the federal rule, so this information applies to both Kentucky and federal courts.) The rub is that 30(b)(6) deponents face a different set of standards for testimony than regular deponents, and that difference could create havoc for a client, up to and including sanctions. More >

Five Ways Municipalities Invite Exposure to Liability

Municipalities can be complicated and complex entities serving hundreds to thousands of individuals and businesses, while  employing numerous people themselves. Cities, not unlike any small or big business, face similar challenges (and liabilities) as  any private corporation, only with the added mandate of providing services and protection for all of those who work or live within their boundaries.  It is impossible, of course, to eliminate all liability facing municipalities in today’s public sector legal environment. Still, liability can be avoided to a large degree with planning and consideration. With that in mind, below are five ways municipalities invite exposure to liability, and more importantly, insight on how to prevent it. More >

Supreme Court Upholds Strict Diversity of Citizenship of Non-Corporate Entities for Diversity Jurisdiction

In a unanimous decision on March 7, 2016, the United States Supreme Court affirmed its longstanding principle that unincorporated entities cannot claim diversity jurisdiction for federal court purposes. This case highlights the striking differences between corporations and other entities, and provides a roadmap for how major unincorporated entities are viewed by the federal court system. More >

Law Firm Management: Principles Should Determine Our Methods

Much ink has been spilled over the various alleged evils attributed to the legal profession. One such evil is the adequacy of the methods by which lawyers do business. There seems to be continual debate over every single facet of the law practice, from client billing methods to the working conditions of attorneys in firms. This focus on only the methods by which we do business is a bottom-up approach, centered on technique and form over substance. Such an approach ignores and therefore fails focus on the values the firm has chosen to embody. More >

Lessons from Law Firm Management: The Multigenerational Workforce

Today one of the more complicated challenges facing law firms is the ability to bridge cultural divides and expectations within a multigenerational workforce. Law firms are often comprised of a wide swath of generations, from partners in their early sixties nearing retirement to young associates in their mid-twenties. The McBrayer group is no different. While our oldest attorneys are Baby Boomers, our newest associates are Millennials, a generation of people who have come of age in the shadow of today's modern technology. To add to this mix is Generation X, sandwiched in between. Each generation brings with it its own life experiences and expectations about the culture of the firm, the amount of work required to be successful within the firm, and what it believes is the appropriate balance between work and life. Often times, these expectations do not appear compatible. However, reflexive leadership responds to these varying expectations and applies these unique generational characteristics in the ways that best serve the firm and its clients. More >

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